National Archaeological Museum: the Antikythera Shipwreck Exhibit Redux

National Archaeological Museum the Antikythera Shipwreck Exhibit Redux (2013-05-26 182)

A small mill for grinding wheat, from the Antikythera shipwreck

I thought that the museum store was closed when I was last at the National Archaeological Museum. Well, I went back today after I toured the National Historical Museum. I did not pay to get in but only asked if I could go to the store. I went down the steps and into the store.

National Archaeological Museum the Antikythera Shipwreck Exhibit Redux (2013-05-26 180)

Bronze nails used to hold the ship together

This has to be the nicest museum shop I’ve seen in Greece. I found the exhibition catalog and the exhibition guide and bought both of them. Luckily I had enough cash, as the shop’s credit card machine was on the fritz.

National Archaeological Museum the Antikythera Shipwreck Exhibit Redux (2013-05-26 178)

Bronze plating that covered the ship’s exterior

To get back into the museum, all I had to do was leave the shop, cut through the cafeteria, and walk up the steps. I immediately went back to look at the Antikythera Exhibit. Specifically, I wanted to look at the Antikythera Youth and compare it to the Charioteer in Delphi.

National Archaeological Museum the Antikythera Shipwreck Exhibit Redux ((2013-05-26 160)

The face of the Antikythera Youth is not smooth but rough

Reexamining the statue, I could see that the surface was pitted and scarred. Could this have been done from sea water and/or organisms? Bronze does not corrode like other metals. So why was the surface so pitted? Was the outer surface covered with something that is now gone?

National Archaeological Museum the Antikythera Shipwreck Exhibit Redux (2013-05-26 157)

Pitting that can be seen on the statue’s left hand and side

Well, I have to admit that I like the Charioteer better, but to simply dismiss this as inferior would be wrong. This is a very nice statue that survived a swim in the Aegean for nearly 2000 years.

National Archaeological Museum the Antikythera Shipwreck Exhibit Redux (2013-05-26 188)

A marble statue of an athelete ruined by being at the bottom of the Aegean (and being lunch for organisms) for centuries

So, I took some more pictures in the exhibition, then I thought that I would run upstairs again to see the Minoan pottery collection, many of the pieces coming from Akroteri on Santorini.

National Archaeological Museum the Antikythera Shipwreck Exhibit Redux (2013-05-26 247)

Ancient grain found buried on Thera and modern grains of the same type

National Archaeological Museum the Antikythera Shipwreck Exhibit Redux (2013-05-26 256)

Alabaster chalice for Minoan rituals, found on Thera

I didn’t spend too long in the Minoan pottery. I was tired and wanted to go and eat. So after I decided that I had enough, I headed over to Victoria Square to see if I could find something to eat.

National Archaeological Museum the Antikythera Shipwreck Exhibit Redux (2013-05-26 252)

Pumice void of a wicker basket. Inside were found sea urchin spines

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